Presenting With Fire Pits

Smart business owners have a keen understanding of the things that matter. If you are going to run a sustainable business over the long term, then you will need to focus on a few key concepts. A good business will present itself well to prospective clients and other businesses. When you get a chance to showcase your products or make a pitch to some other business, it is important to put on a quality presentation. What makes a solid presentation? Preparedness, professionalism, and the willingness to use technology to your advantage are three important starting points.

Technology is your friend
Whether you are a business marketing a new fire pit or some kind of medical equipment, the simple fact remains the same. The way that you present your company will go a long way to determining if people pay attention to you. If you are willing to use technology, your presentation can take off. Audio and visual elements give prospective clients a much better idea of what you have going on. They can actually engage in the presentation, rather than just sit and watch. When they are engaged, you have a much better shot at getting your company’s point across.

The confident approach
You must know, without a shadow of doubt, that your fire pit is the best on the market. Even if there are better products out there, you must exude confidence that is readily apparent to your customers. They will take cues from you on this point. When giving a presentation, the way you carry yourself impacts perception of your message. If the audience believes that you are a good person and if they identify with your core values, then they will give your message a chance. If you lack this confidence, people will know it and your fire pit won’t get the reception that it deserves.

Ultimately, being prepared and approaching the presentation with confidence is a huge part of the battle. When you know what you intend to say and you believe in your message, people will feel that. Add in some good technology and your presentation can go from mundane to influential. The idea is to convince people and using the art of persuasion will win major points. Be excited, put your best foot forward, and chances are good that your prospective fire pit idea will receive a positive reception from those in your audience.

3 Reasons to Use On-Board Housing for Your Drive-thru Speaker & Mic

It seems that with greater frequency people are asking to have their speaker and microphone as a part of their drive-thru menu board. Is this doable? Yes. Is it ideal? No. The reasons vary but can be summed up in short order.

To achieve the optimal sound quality from the communication system the speaker and mic should be within close proximity to the car. In doing such, the inevitable result positions the menu board right up against the curb. This has little to no effect on the driver or driver-side passengers. However, it becomes a bear for those on the passenger side to see the drive-thru as it offers no viewing angle. This leaves these poor souls scrambling for their yoga mats to do their best “upward dog” technique just to sneak a peek at the menu.

Another downside to the onboard setup is that it chews up a significant amount of your graphics space. For instance, take the drive-thru shown in the picture accompanying this blog, the restaurant loses one whole section of their menu board. We’ve actually gone away from this approach and have adopted side and top enclosures that angle towards the car. This way, you can maintain all your graphics space as well as your communication clarity.

With all that being said, there are three scenarios where the on-board speaker mic set up is more appropriate and, in some cases, the only option.

1- Budget
The benefit of having an “all-in-one” set up, which combines your menu board and your headset system, is that it only requires one concrete pad to be poured vs. two. It also eliminates the added expense of the speaker post that you’d need with the other setup. However, it is important to keep in mind that the concrete work isn’t too cumbersome and can be completed with little know-how, a sonotube, and concrete.

2- Available space
Sometimes the lay of the land just doesn’t cooperate. For instance, one of the local McDonald’s has its drive-thru lane pinned up against a retaining wall; there is literally no more room to be had. In these cases, you’re hamstrung into the onboard solution. You will also sometimes see this in dual lane setups where they need to minimize the width of each lane in order to fit the two paths.

3- Wall mount
This goes hand in hand with “budget” and “available space.” The only time you would want to go with a wall-mounted solution is to save some money (no concrete work, no conduit runs, easier install overall, etc.) or it is the only conceivable option for your drive-thru sign. In this case, you’ll more than likely have to house the speaker and mic in or near the sign

So as you can see, there are occasions where it makes sense to have on-board housing for your speaker and mic. However, if you have a few more nickels to spare and the available space at the job site, it is always recommended to have a separate enclosure for your speaker and mic. Just look at the “big guys.” If they have space, they are ALL independent of one another.

How to Give More Effective Presentations?

Have you ever heard a presentation, a lecture, or an acceptance speech that just left you in awe? Did it make you wonder how they did it? How did they make public speaking seem so easy? Even though it may seem like an innate trait, you can learn to become a better, more powerful public speaker.

Public speaking is a skill that is very important to develop. Regardless of the field you work in, you will be interacting with people or groups. By learning to engage the other party, you will have a better time getting through to them and be able to establish yourself as knowledgeable and powerful.

Whether it is in a small conversation or a large presentation, three key elements of public speaking are:

  1. Message content
  2. Audience connection
  3. Message impact

Here, we will discuss the message impact and message content.

First, let’s understand what message impact means. When you are giving a speech, what do you want your audience to take away?

Often times in a company, you may be asked to give a status update on a project or explain a new idea. When doing so, start by writing down what you want to have happen after you give the speech. How do you want them to act- whether that is to support your initiative or help coordinate future actions?

Use those questions to guide the speech. Word it so that it pushes your message.

The next element that we will discuss is message content.

I guarantee that you have sat through a speech that either has gone over your head or became very boring. Often times, it is very technical speech that you cannot fully process.

Yes, having facts in a speech is good- it shows that you are knowledgeable about your presentation- but a good speech is about more than just numbers and charts and data.

If there is a lot of information that you must get across, try breaking it up into different segments, with an engaging break in the middle, or sending out the data sheets afterwards, via email.

The key here is to not bore the audience and ensure that they can process what they are told.

Learning to become a good public speaking will help you get your message across in a more efficient manner. Use these three elements and see how it changes the way people pay attention to your presentations!